Archaeolgoical work at Harbison Crossroads makes local news

Harbison Crossroads

Harbison Crossroads from the project area, facing east-northeast.

You may remember a recent blog post discussing an archaeological investigation in East Tennessee in search of Reynold’s Station. Although the investigation determined it was not the location of Reynold’s Station, there was still an abundance of information that could be obtained from the discovered site . After the initial investigation, it was determined that the site had further potential to yield information on early Euro-American and enslaved African-American inhabitants of East Tennessee and Knox County, and on the material culture of the enslaved and  the changes that took place to the landscape through time.

Recently members from CRA, along with archaeologists from the Tennessee Department of Transportation, were part of a local news story discussing the findings and on-going archaeological investigations. You can read the news story and watch the video clip of the site here.

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Posted in Archaeology Projects, News
3 comments on “Archaeolgoical work at Harbison Crossroads makes local news
  1. bill bayless says:

    I am interested in Reynolds station I’ve lived in Corryton tn on ridgeview rd for bout 25years and now on Monday rd in Plainview in Corryton tn. I metal detect around area at time and its interesting Reynolds block house like a fort in days when Indians was in the area.

  2. bill bayless says:

    My comment above bout Reynolds block house as a fort again Indians back in days in Indian were in this area.

  3. Paul Avery says:

    Mr. Bayless, I was the Principal Investigator on this project. I appreciate your interest in our work! Unfortunately, we found no evidence whatsoever of there having been a station where we worked. In fact, our research showed that Reynolds never owned that particular tract. We did uncover a row of cellars associated with slave cabins dating from 1800-1836 when George Perry owned the property. Please use your metal detector carefully, as once things are excavated, they no longer have their context and important data can be lost. Thanks again for your interest!

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