Are you CRA’s next Accounting Clerk?

Accounting Clerk
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CULTURAL RESOURCE ANALYSTS, Inc. seeks an experienced Accounting Clerk willing to work in a fast paced, ever changing, ambitious environment. The candidate will be expected to learn and implement new procedures within existing software programs. This positions is for the Lexington, Kentucky Corporate Headquarters office.

Accounting Clerk Compensation $32,500 to $37,500 Annually Benefits Offered Medical, Vision, Dental, Life, 401K Employment Type Full-Time

Overview of Responsibilities

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

  • Job Cost Posting into Sage 100
  • Payroll Data Posting into Sage 100
  • Assist HR with new hire onboarding
  • Assign accurate general ledger, project and task codes
  • Reconcile Petty Cash and Per Diem
  • Insure proper documentation is attached to Credit card statements
  • Posting
  • Reconcile Credit Card Statements and Assign accurate general ledger codes
  • Filing
  • Maintain Vendor W-9 and COI files
  • Maintain Vehicle files

GENERAL OFFICE

  • Cover the switchboard and direct calls to the appropriate party
  • Accept and sign for deliveries
  • File
  • Various general office duties
  • Order Office Supplies

Requirements

  • Proven accounting experience, preferably as an Accounts Payable / Receivable Clerk
  • Demonstrate regular attendance and timeliness
  • Strong data entry skills
  • Ability to work in a fast-paced environment
  • Work both independently and in a group
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Willingness to work hard with limited supervision
  • Strong organizational and time management skills
  • Strong communication
  • Ability to multi-task
  • Pleasant voice on phone
  • Sage MAS90 experience a PLUS
  • Familiar with IBM Operating System

Job Type: Full-time

Salary: $32,500.00 to $35,000.00 /year

Experience: Accounting: 1 year

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Want to work for CRA?

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Help Needed Nationwide –

Jason RossCultural Resource Analysts, Inc., (CRA)  is actively seeking supervisory-level archaeologists and architectural historians in all 50 states.  CRA can be called upon with little or no notice to support FEMA activities anywhere in the country.  We are looking for professionals that can be deployed in support of FEMA for Section 106 compliance for periods of performance that may range from one week to a year or even longer.  Unlike the majority of our work where we can staff up as necessary to meet our client’s needs, this contract is far different.  We hope to compile a list of people by state who can be vetted in advance and then used to service the contract at a moment’s notice.

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One Man’s Trash is an Archaeologist’s Treasure

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Historic Artifacts Recovered from Bee Slough

Figure 14. Representative artifacts recovered from Site 12Vg1357: (a) decal-decorated whiteware bowl; (b) decal-decorated porcelain plate with gilt accents; (c) clear BIM glass cup bottom mold commercial food bottle with tooled bead lip; (d) amethyst ABM glass Owens mold base with Thatcher Manufacturing Company mark.

If a man’s trash tells his story, then an archaeologist is the ghost-writer of the story. What may appear to most as discarded relics helps an archaeologist create a picture of what everyday life may have been like years ago. Archaeological sites can vary in age from thousands of years to maybe only fifty or so years in age, but they all have one thing in common: they help paint a picture about the past peoples who created the site.

In 2014, CRA conducted a phase Ia archaeological reconnaissance survey for the Cass/Adams CSO Relief Sewer project in Evansville, Indiana. During this initial survey, one site was recorded. The archaeological site was identified as a mid-nineteenth- through twentieth-century dump located in downtown Evansville. Initially, 61 historic artifacts were recovered by CRA from the site. These artifacts consisted of items most popular during the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century. Because there was little domestic material recovered, it was hypothesized that the site represented a historic community residential dump. After the initial fieldwork, CRA recommended the site be avoided, or if avoidance was not possible, then there should be archaeological monitoring during construction activities. It was during the monitoring of the project that CRA identified more artifacts and could begin to paint a picture of life in Evansville in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Recently, the Evansville Courier & Press spoke with Andy Martin and Aaron Harth of the CRA Evansville office about the discovery and what can be learned from the site. Andy and Aaron explain a little more about the project and the artifacts recovered in the video at the end. Kudos to Tanya Faberson, Andy Martin, Aaron Harth, and all those who helped discover the site!

Old City Dump Discovered

Niquette presented McGimsey-Davis Award

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Chuck receives Charles R. McGimsey III – Hester A. Davis Distinguished Service Award

RPA President Terry Klein presented Chuck with the Charles R. McGimsey III – Hester A. Davis Distinguished Service Award

When you put your heart and soul (and your back) into something, people notice. Charles Niquette, known by most as Chuck, has spent over 30 years preserving prehistory and history both with his company Cultural Resource Analysts, Inc., and through his service with organizations such as the Society for American Archaeology, the Register of Professional Archaeologists, and LEAP.

His dedication to cultural resource management and the discipline of archaeology is evident to all those who meet him. Recently, the Register of Professional Archaeologists acknowledged his dedication by presenting Chuck with the Charles R. McGimsey III – Hester A. Davis Distinguished Service Award at their board meeting.

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Where the Wild Things are…or grow…in Georgia

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Forest Primeval

By Paul G. Avery

Most archaeologists are drawn to the field by a desire for adventure and the thrill of discovery.  Then we find out that our ‘adventures’ consist mostly of pastures, briars, and hundreds of empty holes!  But that’s not always the case.  Sometimes we get all the adventure that we can handle!  We completed a project like that last year.

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Andrew Bradbury Teaches Cub Scouts about Flintknapping

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Bradbury demonstrating flintknapping

CRA archaeologist Andrew Bradbury demonstrating flintknapping to cub scouts. Photo by Shannon Waller.

On June 7, Andrew Bradbury, an archaeologist working in CRA’s Knoxville office, spent a day discussing archaeology and flintknapping with Cub Scouts from the Toqua District (West Knoxville) Day Camp. Every year the scouts have a day camp. The theme this year was Cub Scout Investigation. Each day a different kind of investigation was conducted by the scouts. The theme for June 7th was “digging in the past”. Scouts ages 6–10 took part in the day long program. Four groups of approximately 30 scouts each listened to Mr. Bradbury discuss archaeology and flintknapping. The flintknapping demonstration was rather informal and allowed the kids to ask many questions. Basic stone tool making was demonstrated along with some demonstrations of how various stone tools would have been used prehistorically. Several different tools (scrapers, retouched flakes, projectile point) were made while the scouts watched and asked questions.

The flintknapping demonstration then lead to a discussion of what archaeology is and what archaeologists do. Scouts learned about how archaeologists find sites, basics of excavation, various dating techniques, and what questions can be answered through site excavation. Mr. Bradbury discussed several sites that he had excavated. The scouts asked a number of interesting questions throughout the discussion.

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A Letter to Pat Garrow: Happy Retirement

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Pat Garrow

Pat Garrow

Today Pat Garrow will be retiring from CRA.  While he has only been with CRA for 5 ½ years, his retirement marks the end of a career spanning over 50 years.  Few people can match that longevity or the impact that he has had on the field of archaeology.  In that time, Pat served as a professor, field archaeologist, principal investigator, business owner, author, operations manager, and mentor.  The number of reports, articles, presentations, chapters, and books that he has authored numbers well into the hundreds. If you’ve read about the King site, Chieftans, the D.C. Convention Center, Knoxville Courthouse, Oxon Hill, Yaughan and Curriboo Plantations, Hopewell Cemetery, Florence Stockade, or even a ship excavated from underneath New York City, you’ve read about work with which Pat was involved.

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Presentation on Dead Horse Lateral Pipeline Cultural Resources Research

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DSC00012Lead archaeologist Colin R. Ferriman, Director of Operations – Wyoming, will be presenting the results of the research conducted during the Dead Horse Lateral Pipeline project at 3:30 pm January 29, 2016 at the Moab Information Center, Moab, Utah.

Environmental studies associated with the Dead Horse Lateral Pipeline afforded archaeologists an opportunity to intensively study the cultural resources within and around the pipeline corridor.  This multifaceted research examined both micro analyses associated with individual sites, artifacts, and natural resources as well as macro analyses that focused on the use of the landscape by prehistoric peoples.   The presentation will summarize the project, the prehistory of the region and the results of the study.

All are welcome and encouraged to attend and learn more about the lifeways of a past people and region .

CRA completes 2-year project for Civil War-era cemeteries

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The interpretive sign installed at the Lexington National Cemetery as a result of the CRA project completed for the NCA.

The interpretive sign installed at the Lexington National Cemetery as a result of the CRA project completed for the NCA.

As part of the National Cemetery Administration (NCA), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Cultural Resource Analysts just completed a two-year project to create interpretive signs for NCA’s 79 Civil War-era national cemeteries, 18 Confederate cemeteries, and 15 soldiers’ lots. Working in close collaboration with NCA’s historians, public history specialists Mudpuppy & Waterdog, and leading sign manufacturer Pannier Graphics, the CRA team researched, designed, and manufactured signs presenting the origins of the national cemetery system and the histories of the individual Civil War-era properties under NCA’s care.

In response to the staggering death tolls of the Civil War, which eventually claimed the lives of an estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers, an Omnibus Act of July 17, 1862, directed the president to purchase land to be used as “a national cemetery for the soldiers who shall die in the service of the country.” Fourteen national cemeteries were established that year. Dozens of others were created in the years immediately following the war, established near camps, hospitals, battlefields, and railroad hubs where troops concentrated. By 1884, when the Presidio post cemetery was designated San Francisco National Cemetery, the War Department managed a national cemetery system that stretched coast to coast.

The interpretive sign installed at all Civil War-era national cemeteries.

The interpretive sign installed at all Civil War-era national cemeteries.

The interpretive signs present the diverse origins of these sites, highlighting the local and national events that led to the establishment of each cemetery, the unique landscape design and monuments that characterize each property, and the remarkable individuals who lie in these hallowed grounds. Historic drawings and photographs from the collections of the NCA, the National Archives, the Library of Congress, and local repositories illustrate their stories.

Signs have been installed in cemeteries from Togus, Maine to Saint Augustine, Florida, and from Alexandria, Virginia to Los Angeles, California. Six cemeteries in CRA’s home state of Kentucky were included in the project, including Lexington National Cemetery, seen in the following images. The signs are intended to enrich the experiences of visitors to these important national shrines and will be posted to NCA’s website to a reach a broader audience.

Interpretive sign for Lexington National Cemetery.

Interpretive sign for Lexington National Cemetery.

Interpretive sign installed at Lexington National Cemetery as part of the CRA project for the National Cemetery Administration.

Interpretive sign installed at Lexington National Cemetery as part of the CRA project for the National Cemetery Administration.

Congratulations to the Utah Office

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Congratulations to Marcel Corbeil, Director of Operations – Utah, Bonnie Gibson, and Sara Galbraith on the high praise they received from the  NRCS regarding their work during the first year of  the NRCS Utah ID/IQ contract. The team was rated as exceptional in all categories based on the two projects completed under the NRCS Utah ID/IQ.  Both projects required extensive surveying and the completion of a 50+ page technical report documenting the methods and findings.

CRA looks forward to continuing to meet and exceed the expectations set forth under the NRCS Utah ID/IQ contract.

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