Andrew Bradbury Teaches Cub Scouts about Flintknapping

Bradbury demonstrating flintknapping

CRA archaeologist Andrew Bradbury demonstrating flintknapping to cub scouts. Photo by Shannon Waller.

On June 7, Andrew Bradbury, an archaeologist working in CRA’s Knoxville office, spent a day discussing archaeology and flintknapping with Cub Scouts from the Toqua District (West Knoxville) Day Camp. Every year the scouts have a day camp. The theme this year was Cub Scout Investigation. Each day a different kind of investigation was conducted by the scouts. The theme for June 7th was “digging in the past”. Scouts ages 6–10 took part in the day long program. Four groups of approximately 30 scouts each listened to Mr. Bradbury discuss archaeology and flintknapping. The flintknapping demonstration was rather informal and allowed the kids to ask many questions. Basic stone tool making was demonstrated along with some demonstrations of how various stone tools would have been used prehistorically. Several different tools (scrapers, retouched flakes, projectile point) were made while the scouts watched and asked questions.

The flintknapping demonstration then lead to a discussion of what archaeology is and what archaeologists do. Scouts learned about how archaeologists find sites, basics of excavation, various dating techniques, and what questions can be answered through site excavation. Mr. Bradbury discussed several sites that he had excavated. The scouts asked a number of interesting questions throughout the discussion.

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Posted in Education and Outreach Tagged with: , ,

A Letter to Pat Garrow: Happy Retirement

Pat Garrow

Pat Garrow

Today Pat Garrow will be retiring from CRA.  While he has only been with CRA for 5 ½ years, his retirement marks the end of a career spanning over 50 years.  Few people can match that longevity or the impact that he has had on the field of archaeology.  In that time, Pat served as a professor, field archaeologist, principal investigator, business owner, author, operations manager, and mentor.  The number of reports, articles, presentations, chapters, and books that he has authored numbers well into the hundreds. If you’ve read about the King site, Chieftans, the D.C. Convention Center, Knoxville Courthouse, Oxon Hill, Yaughan and Curriboo Plantations, Hopewell Cemetery, Florence Stockade, or even a ship excavated from underneath New York City, you’ve read about work with which Pat was involved.

Read more ›

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Posted in Archaeology, News, Staff

Presentation on Dead Horse Lateral Pipeline Cultural Resources Research

DSC00012Lead archaeologist Colin R. Ferriman, Director of Operations – Wyoming, will be presenting the results of the research conducted during the Dead Horse Lateral Pipeline project at 3:30 pm January 29, 2016 at the Moab Information Center, Moab, Utah.

Environmental studies associated with the Dead Horse Lateral Pipeline afforded archaeologists an opportunity to intensively study the cultural resources within and around the pipeline corridor.  This multifaceted research examined both micro analyses associated with individual sites, artifacts, and natural resources as well as macro analyses that focused on the use of the landscape by prehistoric peoples.   The presentation will summarize the project, the prehistory of the region and the results of the study.

All are welcome and encouraged to attend and learn more about the lifeways of a past people and region .

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Posted in Archaeology, News

CRA completes 2-year project for Civil War-era cemeteries

Interpretive sign installed at Lexington National Cemetery as part of the CRA project for the National Cemetery Administration.
The interpretive sign installed at the Lexington National Cemetery as a result of the CRA project completed for the NCA.

The interpretive sign installed at the Lexington National Cemetery as a result of the CRA project completed for the NCA.

As part of the National Cemetery Administration (NCA), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, Cultural Resource Analysts just completed a two-year project to create interpretive signs for NCA’s 79 Civil War-era national cemeteries, 18 Confederate cemeteries, and 15 soldiers’ lots. Working in close collaboration with NCA’s historians, public history specialists Mudpuppy & Waterdog, and leading sign manufacturer Pannier Graphics, the CRA team researched, designed, and manufactured signs presenting the origins of the national cemetery system and the histories of the individual Civil War-era properties under NCA’s care.

In response to the staggering death tolls of the Civil War, which eventually claimed the lives of an estimated 700,000 Union and Confederate soldiers, an Omnibus Act of July 17, 1862, directed the president to purchase land to be used as “a national cemetery for the soldiers who shall die in the service of the country.” Fourteen national cemeteries were established that year. Dozens of others were created in the years immediately following the war, established near camps, hospitals, battlefields, and railroad hubs where troops concentrated. By 1884, when the Presidio post cemetery was designated San Francisco National Cemetery, the War Department managed a national cemetery system that stretched coast to coast.

The interpretive sign installed at all Civil War-era national cemeteries.

The interpretive sign installed at all Civil War-era national cemeteries.

The interpretive signs present the diverse origins of these sites, highlighting the local and national events that led to the establishment of each cemetery, the unique landscape design and monuments that characterize each property, and the remarkable individuals who lie in these hallowed grounds. Historic drawings and photographs from the collections of the NCA, the National Archives, the Library of Congress, and local repositories illustrate their stories.

Signs have been installed in cemeteries from Togus, Maine to Saint Augustine, Florida, and from Alexandria, Virginia to Los Angeles, California. Six cemeteries in CRA’s home state of Kentucky were included in the project, including Lexington National Cemetery, seen in the following images. The signs are intended to enrich the experiences of visitors to these important national shrines and will be posted to NCA’s website to a reach a broader audience.

Interpretive sign for Lexington National Cemetery.

Interpretive sign for Lexington National Cemetery.

Interpretive sign installed at Lexington National Cemetery as part of the CRA project for the National Cemetery Administration.

Interpretive sign installed at Lexington National Cemetery as part of the CRA project for the National Cemetery Administration.

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Posted in Architectural History Projects, News, Projects

Congratulations to the Utah Office

Congratulations to Marcel Corbeil, Director of Operations – Utah, Bonnie Gibson, and Sara Galbraith on the high praise they received from the  NRCS regarding their work during the first year of  the NRCS Utah ID/IQ contract. The team was rated as exceptional in all categories based on the two projects completed under the NRCS Utah ID/IQ.  Both projects required extensive surveying and the completion of a 50+ page technical report documenting the methods and findings.

CRA looks forward to continuing to meet and exceed the expectations set forth under the NRCS Utah ID/IQ contract.

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Posted in News

Bradbury and Bundy published in The Missouri Archaeologist

Baxter Lake Site Block A.

Excavations at Baxter Lake Site Block A during the AOS project in 2005.

Andrew P. Bradbury and Paul D. Bundy were recently published in The Missouri Archaeologist. Their article “The Early Arcahic Hardin Barbed Component at the Baxter Lake Site, Lewis County, Missouri” was published in Volume 75  of The Missouri Archaeologist.

The published article discusses in-depth their excavations of the Baxter Lake Site during the Avenue of Saints project in 2005. The work consisted of intensive investigations conducted in three stages. During the investigations  intact deposits were identified. Ultimately, the investigation identified an Early Archaic Hardin Barbed component at the site. With the data gathered during the excavations, Bradbury and Bundy were able to construct a picture of what Early Archaic lifeways may have looked like in the area.

You can read the full article in Volume 75 of The Missouri Archaeologist. To find out how to subscribe to The Missouri Archaeologist, visit their website.

Congratulations to Andrew P. Bradbury and Paul D. Bundy on their recent publication.

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Posted in Archaeology Projects, News

Pat Garrow Receives Carol V. Ruppe Distinguished Service Award

Pat Garrow receiving the Carol V. Ruppe Distinguished Service Award.
Pat Garrow receiving the Carol V. Ruppe Distinguished Service Award.

Pat Garrow receiving the Carol V. Ruppe Distinguished Service Award.

Pat Garrow, Director of Operations for the Knoxville, Tennessee office, recently attended the annual Society for Historical Archaeology meeting in Seattle, Washington, where he was awarded the Carol V. Ruppé Distinguished Service Award. The award was publicly announced in 1990 and “named in honor of Carol V. Ruppé in recognition of her long service to the society in creating and running The Soceity for Historical Archaeology Book Room at the annual conference,” according to the SHA website. Pat Garrow is the sixth recipient of this award.

“I was honored and pleased to receive the Carol V. Ruppe Distinguished Service Award at the Society for Historical Archaeology meeting in Seattle. My first SHA meeting was Charleston, SC, in 1975, and I have attended most of the meetings since that time. The SHA is very special to me, and the Ruppe Award means a great deal to me.”

Congratulations Pat Garrow on your prestigious award!pat

north_finished

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Posted in Archaeology, Conference, News, Staff

New Contract with the Fort Worth District Corps of Engineers

cropped-logo_small21.jpgCRA is pleased to announce a new contract with the Fort Worth District Corps of Engineers. The contract is a five year long environmental services agreement with $30m capacity. Our company is one of several subcontractors for the Prime, JESCO Environmental & Geotechnical Services, Inc. (SBA 8(a), EDWOSB, SDB, DBE, Woman Owned Small Business).   Work under this contract includes providing installation support in maintaining compliance with all applicable federal and state environmental regulations and Army guidance, regulations, and requirements. Work to be performed under this contract may include conservation, cultural resources, natural resources and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) support, environmental compliance, environmental and technical support, environmental analysis, environmental program management support, environmental sampling of various media, laboratory testing, environmental and occupational safety and health compliance audits and training, environmental assessments, environmental data inventories, hazardous and regulated waste handling and management, permit applications, community involvement, environmental services, environmental investigation, and other scientific and technological investigations to accomplish the mission. CRA is excited to be a part of this contract.

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Posted in News, Projects

CRA sponsors World Road Cycling Championships in Richmond, Virginia

The World Road Cycling Championships (Worlds) is cycling’s pinnacle event and will be held in Richmond, Virginia, September 19-27, 2015. About 1,000 of the world’s top cyclists from about 75 countries will compete,  and over 450,000 spectators are expected, with a TV audience of 300 million. All road races will take place on a challenging, technical and inner-city road circuit through downtown Richmond and Monument Avenue, which includes twisty, cobbled climbs at 20% grades. Visit http://richmond2015.com for more information on the race course.

As a local business, Cultural Resource Analysts, Inc.’s Richmond office is proud to support the Worlds event with membership in the Société 2015. Businesses across the region are coming together to welcome the Worlds event to Richmond. CRA is excited to work with the other businesses to show off the great city of Richmond. Learn more about CRA’s involvement, and other business involved, at:  www.societe2015.com.

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Posted in News

September is Kentucky’s Annual Archaeology Month

KAMPoster_2014As the leaves start to turn and fall arrives, the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists (KyOPA) celebrates the rich history of Kentucky through the second annual Archaeology month in September. KyOPA has numerous events planned throughout the month that highlight the heritage of Kentucky and allow citizens to explore the history of the state through archaeology. Be sure to check out their website for more information on the events planned throughout the month!

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Posted in Archaeology, News

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